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A Basic Difference Between Wing Tsun and Other Martial Arts

The difference between Wing Tsun and other martial arts is not always obvious. Many of the martial arts that come from the so-called Shaolin root have a basic set of movements called a “form” which is a pattern of hand movements and steps which might be compared to a dance. However, the techniques have fighting applications. The principals are normally how the style defends and attacks, how to get power, how to turn and fight and so on.

Wing Tsun does have a basic form called Siu Nim Tau. Its meaning is “Little Idea Form.” The techniques in the form teach very basic ideas such as the “Character Sun Thrusting Punch” and the three seed techniques, tan sau, fook sau and bong sau plus two more sections of techniques totaling 108 points.

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Learning Out of Context

At Wing Tsun Martial Arts in Gilbert AZ, we start your training where it should start; at the beginning. For those considering learning just the sticky hands techniques and applications (even just a few of them) of Wing Chun (or Ving Tsun or even Wing Tsun), from an instructor willing to try and teach it to a novice or a person of another style that may not have been taught the first part of the system, there is a caveat. Do not expect what you have been shown to work for you in real situations. Wing Tsun is not a grab bag of techniques that you can just pull out of context, mimic and be able to use in a real situation.

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The Concept of Chi Sau as a Martial Arts Drill

Martial arts drills that set Wing Tsun kung-fu apart from others include chi sau. Chi sau is a drill that often becomes a form of sparring. Some other Chinese martial arts have a tradition of a clinging arms drill like Wing Tsun’s chi sau but not as thorough in its focus.

Chi sau is also referred to as ‘sticky hands.’ This reference is because the idea of ‘sticking’ or ‘clinging’ to an attacker’s arms gives the defender the information needed to defend such as the strength of the attack, the direction, the momentum, and the reality of the attack. Without sticking there is the risk of mischaracterizing a threat by seeing an attack coming which can be deceptive.

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About the Sticky Hands

About the Sticky Hands

Most followers of martial arts should know this does not refer to a person with an uncontrollable desire to steal. It refers to a method to stick to an attacker’s arms (or legs) in order to keep track of and ultimately evade, deflect, or dissolve an attack by an adversary. Bruce Lee brought this training drill to the attention of martial arts followers in martial arts magazines in the late 60s and early seventies, having studied from then living Grandmaster Yip Man of ‘Wing Chun.’ Not all the details could be told …

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Live in the Present

 

Living in the present

Part of the philosophy of WingTsun training and follow through in a real self-defense situation is a sort of a present moment outlook which is that we focus on what we are doing now – not what occurred just a second ago and not what might occur in the next few seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks or even longer. This doesn’t mean we cannot have a goal. However we cannot let our mind drift and get torn away from our focus on the present moment. Our goal will be realized when it is and not before.

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Improve Your Senses and Consciousness

Improve Your Senses and Consciousness

In order to stick to your attacker’s arms, you must live in the present moment and not let your attention waiver.

Learning a tactile skill like chi sau in the art of WingTsun kung-fu can improve your senses and consciousness. Relying on just the sense of touch or more like sticking with your training partner’s arms (or legs!) allows you to know when a person is about to make a move. One can also feel the direction and amount of power a person is using. The time factor in response to an attacker’s movements is reduced to zero! What many martial arts instructors never get around to explaining is that if an attacker wants to rain punches down on you at full speed, no block, no defense of any kind that does not involve ‘stick’ can prevent those punches from hitting you. In addition, the best defense is a good offense in such a situation.

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Improve Your Senses and Consciousness

Improve Your Senses and Consciousness

In order to stick to your attacker’s arms, you must live in the present moment and not let your attention waiver.

Learning a tactile skill like chi sau in the art of WingTsun kung-fu can improve your senses and consciousness. Relying on just the sense of touch or more like sticking with your training partner’s arms (or legs!) allows you to know when a person is about to make a move. One can also feel the direction and amount of power a person is using. The time factor in response to an attacker’s movements is reduced to zero! What many martial arts instructors never get around to explaining is that if an attacker wants to rain punches down on you at full speed, no block, no defense of any kind that does not involve ‘stick’ can prevent those punches from hitting you. In addition, the best defense is a good offense in such a situation.

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Wing Tsun has All the Elements for Your Success

Wing Tsun has All the Elements for Your Success

Wing Tsun has all the elements for your success in life and the martial arts if one chooses to mine the benefits. What comes first? Your patience in learning or your learning to be patient? Thus we have a seemingly eternal chicken or the egg type of question.

Some martial arts instructors, in an effort to appease new students who do not initially possess the attributes necessary to learn something that requires patience, fill their curriculum with a fair amount of ‘fluff.’ Nothing wrong with having fun but, we believe, not at the expense of the student’s understanding the material and their ultimate success with their training.

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Wing Tsun Chi Sau

Wing Tsun Chi Sau

Is Wing Tsun chi sau different than in other martial arts that have a sticky hands drill? First, one of the most significant differences between so many other commonly available martial arts and Wing Tsun is the ‘chi sau’ training and its seven basic sections of techniques. The words chi sau translate to the English words sticky hands, which is to say we stick with an opponent’s limbs as he attacks in order to defend ourselves. This applies to the legs as well as the arms. The words ‘chi sau’ translate as ‘sticky hands.’ e common explanation as to why this is important is that you can ‘keep track’ of the attacker’s arms so that you are not hit or grabbed. It goes deeper than that, however.

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You Need Wing Tsun

You Need Wing Tsun

You need Wing Tsun for the most effective way to get benefit ‘mileage’ from a martial art. You do not have to learn 400 different, separate modes of movement unrelated to each other to learn complete self-defense. Under attack, a non-trained person can freeze. No movement – no action, just a victim for lack of learned automatic reactions. Fear creates this freeze reaction because the victim has learned no confidence, had no training, has mind-body conflicts because of inappropriate principals learned, or has no knowledge at all.

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