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Martial Art Techniques and Sparring

The martial art techniques used by Wing Tsun practitioners are economical in movement. They are geared toward self-defense and stopping an attacker. Wing Tsun has always been a self-defense system and so the techniques are strictly practical in real situations. There is no sport application. There is a lot of talk about sparring in various internet articles, expounding on the benefits. Certainly, there must be some interaction and realistic application training to be an effective training. Sparring offers this kind of effective training. Without it, how does one respond if the student does not know the natural of the attack? A student must learn how to react, should he or she see a technique coming and how to respond in a fast and tense exchange.

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IS YOUR MARTIAL ART GOOD FOR SELF DEFENSE?

The best self defense martial art might be the one that has viable applications for self defense being taught regularly to the students which are based on its traditional techniques. If the martial art being taught is for tournament application and an entirely different, unrelated program is presented for self defense, it is hard to call that martial art the best self defense martial art.

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Wing Tsun Fighting

Wing Tsun Fighting

As many people who surf the internet might know, there is a great deal of uninformed nonsense about Wing Chun / Wing Tsun/ Ving Tsun. Most are easily refuted with a little bit of research.

What is true is that Grandmaster Yip Man taught everybody differently. Why this happened I will leave to my Si-fu, WingTsun Grandmaster Leung Ting’s explanations in his book Roots and Branches of Wing Tsun.

Wing Tsun as passed down to the present day is meant to be a complete fighting system. If people misinterpret it, it is not because there is something ‘missing’ in the art.

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Lat Sau

Lat Sau

In the Wing Tsunworld, Lat Sau means “free-hand fighting.”  Lat Sau comes after chi sau.  In other words, chi sau is a bridge toward actual fighting. Chi sau (sticky hands) is an exercise that has combative elements but is not full-on fighting.  Chi sau practice builds sensitivity in the arms or legs to the movements of our attacker.  It enables a defender to counter instantly in response to the mode of attack.  Of course, chi sau creates an artificial situation in order to focus on building the skill of the feeling of our attacker’s movements through arm and leg contact.

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