Once a layperson who has an interest in martial arts also becomes acquainted with Wing Tsun (or wing chun) techniques, the fascination often begins. Due partly to online videos, tons of chatter, posts, blogs, and YouTube stars, many “wing chun fans” become obsessed. All the internet surfer wants to do is be like the guy in the videos or the star of the movie about Yip Man. It is a shame that the obsession doesn’t include an obsession with the ‘secret’ of Wing Tsun.

Read more

Two methods of evading an attack using Wing Tsun methods will be described here. Evading an attack in the martial art of Wing Tsun™ involves movement in the most economical way. Wing Tsun uses the smallest movements possible. The first method involves a compact turning out of the path of the attack. Only one foot is required to make the turn. It might be more accurate to call this a shift. A practitioner of Wing Tsun™ turns on the center of the foot. To train this skill, you must be sure that both the toe and the heel turn at the same rate and angle. As you do this, 100% of your body weight must shift to one leg. The back remains straight with gravity. Your back must not lean back. The turn is normally at least 45 degrees but can be as much as 90 degrees. The non-weighted leg remains on the floor with light pressure but NO weight!

Read more

The legendary founder of Wing Tsun is supposed to have analyzed the techniques of her native martial art, Shaolin and found it impractical to learn and impractical to use in a real encounter against her stronger male adversaries. She reduced the repeated movements in the forms and reduced the total number of choreographed forms. It is doubtful that the full transformation in developing her own method took place in one generation. She taught another female, a teenager named Yim Wing Tsun and it was passed among a series of family members and “Red Boat” opera performers over a 250-year history.

Read more

The Siu Nim Tau is the first set of movements of Wing Tsun kungfu. The literal translation is the “Little Idea Form.” The first section of the form is done slowly. We are told by our instructors that doing it daily is important and the slower the better. The form has multiple benefits including a deep breathing subset which has a de-stressing benefit.

After you perform the Siu Nim Tau, is that the end of it? Are there not lessons we can gain from this form, this practice?

Read more

From the first few Wing Tsun lessons, you learn to move both hands at the same time, doing different tasks. We know that if you try to defend first, then attack, it is much too late. Your opponent’s next attack is already on the way! It is completely unrealistic to consider the defend-then-attack scenario. We see this all the time in real fights. Quite often the combatants attack at the same time. Often, both miss in landing their first attacks.

Read more

Wing Tsun is an old martial art, the creator(s) of which which reduced the number of movements of the old Shaolin systems to create a new system. Relatively fewer representative techniques remain within Wing Tsun forms to preserve them and allow you, a practitioner, to access the roots and intentions of the founders. Unlike other arts of that era, however, Wing Tsun became an urban self-defense system with applications highly relevant for today.

Read more

The first form, called the Little Idea Form, teaches one hand at a time, standing in one place. The second section of the form teaches two hands at a time doing the same technique. The third section of the form uses more complex movements using one hand at a time. The whole set of movements, all three sections are performed standing in one place.
The second form adds in mobile footwork and two hands doing two different tasks. It contains elements of multiple attacker skills training. It also contains three different kicking methods.

Read more

Many people who enter training in a martial art in today’s America take it as a lark. They want to brag to their friends that they “take kung-fu” or they “take karate.” In ancient times the real purpose was to defend oneself as a soldier or to survive in violent times. Very seldom was there a situation where a student walked into a school of martial arts to start their training. More often, a family member or a friend of a friend recommended an instructor. Instruction might have taken place behind closed doors. An instructor kept an eye on their new student for at least several months to see if they had what it takes and that their student would not bring dishonor to their martial arts family.

Read more

The September – Labor Day Special starts NOW! The offer is one introductory month of unlimited classes for $55.00 (1/2 off reg. rate for unlimited classes). The way to get this special offer is to fill out the form on our web site at https://wingtsunaz.com/trial-lesson/.  The offer is not available by phone.

Request a trial lesson. Arrive at the time we schedule you which will be Monday, Tuesday or Thursday at 6:15 pm. Pay the $25 for the trial lesson in cash or check. If you like it. you pay the balance of $30 for the rest of the month! This offer expires Thursday September 27.

Note: After one month, you may sign up on one of our regular programs.*

*Must join the IWTA-NAS within 30 days of your first regular class. Cost is @ $60 per year, pro-rated to December 31, 2018. CASH or CHECK only. *Official uniform available online. Internet price approximately $115 for shoes, trousers, t-shirt. 

Offer not valid for clients active within the past 12 months.

“When will my life situation, i.e., schedule, money, living conditions be “perfect” enough to study WingTsun™?” The answer: NEVER. Life is never perfect. And if we wait until things are perfect, we will look back in regret at things never achieved. Procrastination is something we’ve all been guilty of but have you ever regretted pursuing something worthwhile? Of course not.

The above words, “commitment and sacrifice” are spoken in the context of competitive sports a lot in contemporary America.  However, in the greed-driven world of professional sports, the words can sound hollow.  “Sacrifice indeed. That player makes a million or more dollars per year,” you say. True. That player sacrificed but he received a huge monetary reward. What the player received in personal satisfaction, probably only the player knows for sure.

Read more