Wing Tsun Kung Fu Chain Punches, part I

I just checked out a post by Robert JR Graham on his site called Kung Fu Chain PunchesIt is really my article on Three WingTsun Kung Fu Punches.  The article discusses the three different WingTsun punches that are taught in three separate WingTsun forms, Siu Nim Tau, Chum Kiu and Biu Tze.  At the end, the point is made that in WingTsun, many things are done in threes.  The three chain punches at the end of the forms recognize that humans only have two hands.  If you throw three punches and your opponent tries to block each one with each hand, he does not have a hand left to defend the third punch!

Intention with SNT

The mental and physical health benefits of regular WingTsun™ training go beyond heart rate, respiration, muscle tone and confidence.  The WingTsun system fits in with the characteristics of several other “internal” martial arts. Many internal martial arts spend a great deal of time developing the internal energy. This is a worthwhile pursuit…

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Begin with a little idea

WingTsun™ begins with a set of movements called Siu Nim Tau. This name translates as Little Idea Form. The first third of this set of movements is done slowly. Learning how to move patiently and slowly through a set of movements over several minutes challenges many new students. It is revealing how many people rush through this set. We are trained in our modern world to get things done quickly and only quickly. WingTsun can be a study of opposites, looking at life as fast or slow. The name Little Idea is significant in its deeper meaning. On the surface it means “basic concept.” On a deeper level it means that the student is learning a little idea that is too important to brush off or run past. A farmer would not plant a seed on the surface and then let the wind blow it away or fail to water it. The seed, after all, carries the DNA of the plant. The Siu Nim Tau carries the DNA of the WingTsun system.

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WingTsun Forms

Form.  What is “form?”  Form refers to sets of movements in a martial art that define that system of martial art. In Chinese systems they are called “kuen.” In Japanese systems they are called “kata.” Some Korean styles call them “hyung.” Some martial arts have nine or ten forms and some have fifty or more! Memorizing and perfecting forms takes quite a bit of time. The more forms, the more time. The idea is to perfect the movement, sometimes for its own sake and sometimes to attain certain practical skills. In modern times, the practice of forms has evolved into performance and competition, at least in some martial arts circles. The forms are supposed to represent scenarios that are defense movements against several attackers in logical sequences. The sequences are performed in front of judges who grade on several criteria and winners are determined in a way similar to gymnastics or figure skating.

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