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The legendary founder of Wing Tsun is supposed to have analyzed the techniques of her native martial art, Shaolin and found it impractical to learn and impractical to use in a real encounter against her stronger male adversaries. She reduced the repeated movements in the forms and reduced the total number of choreographed forms. It is doubtful that the full transformation in developing her own method took place in one generation. She taught another female, a teenager named Yim Wing Tsun and it was passed among a series of family members and “Red Boat” opera performers over a 250-year history.

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A man dressed in black jumps out of the dark area behind the shrub and reaches for your neck.  Your training kicks in and you step sideways, and he turns you as he grabs your shoulder.  You didn’t choose to turn in that manner.  He turned you, but it surprises him.  You lift a punch under his left arm and connect with the soft tissue behind his chin.  The noise is sickening as he bites his tongue and screams but you do not stop.  You follow up with chain punches to his nose!  He falls back and holds his face.  You decide to bolt out of there, glad that you have your safety and your life. 

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Wing Tsun is completely different in its approach to getting power. For those immersed in another discipline, this statement is met with a lot of skepticism. It just seems easier to develop power using a person’s native power to hit or kick. Internal power has a mysterious ring to it.

To clarify the reason for Wing Tsun’s internal power, we must explain why this approach is the one we take in Wing Tsun. Often, power, when in actual use in self-defense, is a relative term.

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