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Movement skills, tactile skills

Movement skills

Every student of any martial art must learn new movement skills.  Some martial arts are athletic in their approach. A student must stretch, strengthen, use calisthenics and aerobic exercise in addition to stances, kicks, long range punching, power exercises, jumping skills, tumbling skills and other athletic skills.

WingTsun™ is less about high kicks, jumping kicks, spin kicks, and bending into low stances, – we have none of those – than it is about being sharply focused on self-defense skills.  However the skills developed in WingTsun training are more like sharpening a knife than making a dinner recipe. The creators of WingTsun realized that self-defense cannot happen with a recipe. There is no recipe. A student must be prepared to sharpen his or her weapons. In the case of WingTsun, it is the whole body.

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Forward Energy

There are analogies for life within the art of Wing Tsun kung-fu. One such analogy is the idea of forward energy.

Martial arts analogies exist in other arts but Wing Tsun seems to have many, perhaps because of its concepts. To prevail in an encounter with an opponent, it can be necessary to maintain forward energy and forward direction. To stand still can be deadly to you. Forward energy and forward movement forces an attacker to spend time and attention to deal with you. In addition, it is far more difficult to stop, block or deflect an oncoming counterattack than one that stands still. A moving target is difficult. One that is coming right at you is worse.

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The Concept of Chi Sau as a Martial Arts Drill

Martial arts drills that set Wing Tsun kung-fu apart from others include chi sau. Chi sau is a drill that often becomes a form of sparring. Some other Chinese martial arts have a tradition of a clinging arms drill like Wing Tsun’s chi sau but not as thorough in its focus.

Chi sau is also referred to as ‘sticky hands.’ This reference is because the idea of ‘sticking’ or ‘clinging’ to an attacker’s arms gives the defender the information needed to defend such as the strength of the attack, the direction, the momentum, and the reality of the attack. Without sticking there is the risk of mischaracterizing a threat by seeing an attack coming which can be deceptive.

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Martial Art Techniques and Sparring

The martial art techniques used by Wing Tsun practitioners are economical in movement. They are geared toward self-defense and stopping an attacker. Wing Tsun has always been a self-defense system and so the techniques are strictly practical in real situations. There is no sport application. There is a lot of talk about sparring in various internet articles, expounding on the benefits. Certainly, there must be some interaction and realistic application training to be an effective training. Sparring offers this kind of effective training. Without it, how does one respond if the student does not know the natural of the attack? A student must learn how to react, should he or she see a technique coming and how to respond in a fast and tense exchange.

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About the Sticky Hands

About the Sticky Hands

Most followers of martial arts should know this does not refer to a person with an uncontrollable desire to steal. It refers to a method to stick to an attacker’s arms (or legs) in order to keep track of and ultimately evade, deflect, or dissolve an attack by an adversary. Bruce Lee brought this training drill to the attention of martial arts followers in martial arts magazines in the late 60s and early seventies, having studied from then living Grandmaster Yip Man of ‘Wing Chun.’ Not all the details could be told …

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Live in the Present

 

Living in the present

Part of the philosophy of WingTsun training and follow through in a real self-defense situation is a sort of a present moment outlook which is that we focus on what we are doing now – not what occurred just a second ago and not what might occur in the next few seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks or even longer. This doesn’t mean we cannot have a goal. However we cannot let our mind drift and get torn away from our focus on the present moment. Our goal will be realized when it is and not before.

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Wing Tsun Chi Sau

Wing Tsun Chi Sau

Is Wing Tsun chi sau different than in other martial arts that have a sticky hands drill? First, one of the most significant differences between so many other commonly available martial arts and Wing Tsun is the ‘chi sau’ training and its seven basic sections of techniques. The words chi sau translate to the English words sticky hands, which is to say we stick with an opponent’s limbs as he attacks in order to defend ourselves. This applies to the legs as well as the arms. The words ‘chi sau’ translate as ‘sticky hands.’ e common explanation as to why this is important is that you can ‘keep track’ of the attacker’s arms so that you are not hit or grabbed. It goes deeper than that, however.

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Use your brain, train your body

Use your brain, train your body

WingTsun™ is a mind-body exercise in addition to being a first line of defense if you are ever attacked. Unarmed self-defense is ready to go. It could be too late to reach for a weapon and the weapon can be taken away from you by the attacker. WingTsun trains your mind and body to react in an appropriate way according to the threat. We as human beings are not born with the same instincts as animals not or we trained by our parents from birth to defend ourselves like in the animal kingdom. Sharp claws and enormous strength are not something we are born with.  These attributes, along with fighting skills have to be trained.

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The Chi Sau Factor

 The Chi Sau Factor

The topic that really grabs a lot of attention in martial arts circles when you say “Wing Chun” or Wing Tsun is chi sau (sticky hands*). These two words describe the one thing that the martial arts public knows only exists in Wing Tsun / Wing Chun.** Chi sau is the reason Wing Tsun dominates the close-range in fights and self-defense. This is so true that there are numerous copy-cats. Some invent their own style with “sticky hands” as a feature. Some try to incorporate it into an existing style. None of them equal the original of course.

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Lat Sau

Lat Sau

In the Wing Tsunworld, Lat Sau means “free-hand fighting.”  Lat Sau comes after chi sau.  In other words, chi sau is a bridge toward actual fighting. Chi sau (sticky hands) is an exercise that has combative elements but is not full-on fighting.  Chi sau practice builds sensitivity in the arms or legs to the movements of our attacker.  It enables a defender to counter instantly in response to the mode of attack.  Of course, chi sau creates an artificial situation in order to focus on building the skill of the feeling of our attacker’s movements through arm and leg contact.

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