Posts

The manual for training for full-contact fights with Wing Tsun has been available for over 30 years. It is called Dynamic Wing Tsun Kung Fu by Grandmaster Leung Ting.  The book is, in part, a basic book for those interested in fighting applications and part training manual for winning a full contact ring fight. The book includes photos and short descriptions of 12 different fighters that won their fights in such countries as Malaysia, Hong Kong, Denmark and Yugoslavia in the early years of Grandmaster Leung Tings’s teaching career.

Read more

The martial art techniques used by Wing Tsun practitioners are economical in movement. They are geared toward self-defense and stopping an attacker. Wing Tsun has always been a self-defense system and so the techniques are strictly practical in real situations. There is no sport application. There is a lot of talk about sparring in various internet articles, expounding on the benefits. Certainly, there must be some interaction and realistic application training to be an effective training. Sparring offers this kind of effective training. Without it, how does one respond if the student does not know the natural of the attack? A student must learn how to react, should he or she see a technique coming and how to respond in a fast and tense exchange.

Read more

 WingTsun™ vs. other martial arts

One of the most important differences between Leung Ting WingTsun® and other martial arts is the idea of DIRECT versus INDIRECT…

This concept is related to the straight-line / center line concept and so I must explain this concept first in order to make the DIRECT versus INDIRECT concept clearer. In WingTsun, we always attack and simultaneously defend with the center line in mind. The center line is the shortest straight-line. While our WingTsun fighter is guarding this line 100% of the time, our attacker is forced to go around the center line defenses to try and grab or hit our WingTsun fighter.

Read more

Lat Sau

In the Wing Tsunworld, Lat Sau means “free-hand fighting.”  Lat Sau comes after chi sau.  In other words, chi sau is a bridge toward actual fighting. Chi sau (sticky hands) is an exercise that has combative elements but is not full-on fighting.  Chi sau practice builds sensitivity in the arms or legs to the movements of our attacker.  It enables a defender to counter instantly in response to the mode of attack.  Of course, chi sau creates an artificial situation in order to focus on building the skill of the feeling of our attacker’s movements through arm and leg contact.

Read more